The Overman and the Arahant: Models of Human Perfection in Nietzsche and Buddhism (English)

In: Asian Philosophy   ;  21 ,  1  ;  53-69  ;  2011

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Two models of human perfection proposed by Nietzsche and the Buddha are investigated. Both the overman and the arahant need practice and individual effort as key to their realization, and they share roughly the same conception of the self as a construction. However, there are also a number of salient differences. Though realizing it to be constructed, the overman does proclaim himself through his assertion of the will to power. The realization of the true nature of the self does not lead the overman to seek the way to be released from saṃsara as does the arahant. On the contrary, he rejoices in the eternally recurring situation. The arahant, however, has totally relinquished any attachment to the self, constructed or otherwise. The arahant does not care about the Eternal Recurrence, as he only focuses on the present moment. Finally, they are both beyond good and evil, but in a substantively different way.

Table of contents – Volume 21, Issue 1

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The tables of contents are generated automatically and are based on the data records of the individual contributions available in the index of the TIB portal. The display of the Tables of Contents may therefore be incomplete.

1
Indian Rational Theology: Proof, Justification, and Epistemic Liberality in Nyaya's Argument for God
Dasti, Matthew R. | 2011
23
On Matsyanyaya: The State of Nature in Indian Thought
Slakter, David | 2011
35
Truth, Deception, and Skillful Means in the Lotus Sutra
Schroeder, John | 2011
53
The Overman and the Arahant: Models of Human Perfection in Nietzsche and Buddhism
Hongladarom, Soraj | 2011
71
The Moral and Non-Moral Virtues in Confucian Ethics
Wong, Wai-ying | 2011
83
Balancing Rights and Trust: Towards a Fiduciary Common Future
Nuyen, A. T. | 2011
97
Emotion and Agency in Zhuangzi
Fraser, Chris | 2011
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